Sub-zero weather possible across the area

Bill Hancock
Runnels County Register
Severe winter weather is expected to envelope the area from Saturday through the day on Monday. Sub-zero temperatures, including wind chill, are expected to range from -2 to -14 degrees. The high Sunday is predicted to be in the teens. The high Monday isn't expected to get above the single digits.

This story will be updated with the daily forecasts each morning.

Get your heavy winter jackets out! An Arctic cold front has already chilled the area with sub-freezing temperatures but the worst is yet to com. The mercury expected to plunge over the weekend and through Monday. The high temperatures aren't expected to get above the freezing mark, keeping the area in the deep freeze for approximately 72-hours.

The National Weather Service has predicted temperatures to drop to sub-zero with windchill. Saturday and Sunday the high temperature is expected to be in the teens or low 20s. The windchill on Sunday will keep temps in the single digits according to the NWS. The warning also said that lows on Monday, with windchill, will range between -4 and -16 degrees.

Severe winter weather is expected to envelope the area from Saturday through the day on Monday. Sub-zero temperatures, including wind chill, are expected to range from -2 to -14 degrees. The high Sunday is predicted to be in the teens. The high Monday isn't expected to get above the single digits.

As of the writing of this story (Thursday, February 11), the NWS has said that freezing precipitation can be expected on Saturday, with snow expected on Sunday and Monday. The possibility exists for significant accumulation. The area has already experienced snow accumulations up to 5" this winter.

Yahoo! reports that according to a doctor they spoke to, Robert Segal, M.D., it is best to stay indoors if the temperature is 0°F or lower, or if the windchill is -17°F or lower.

According to Bustle.com, extreme cold can be deadly in several ways, "Three of the major health issues that can occur in very cold weather are hypothermia, frostbite, and heart attack, according to Healthline. The site explains that hypothermia 'occurs when your body temperature drops below 95°F (35°C)' and 'results from your body losing more heat than it can make.'

Frostbite is when the skin is damaged from the cold, and can include blisters, white/gray and waxy/hard skin, and, in the most extreme cases, the skin turning black.

As for heart attacks, the risk of one increases in extremely cold weather because 'your heart works harder to keep you warm — leading to increased heart rate and blood pressure.'"

Please be sure to make accommodations ahead of time for your pets!

The American Veterinary Medical Association (www.AVMA.org) offers advice on pets and cold weather, "Just like people, pets' cold tolerance can vary from pet to pet based on their coat, body fat stores, activity level, and health. Be aware of your pet's tolerance for cold weather, and adjust accordingly. You will probably need to shorten your dog's walks in very cold weather to protect you both from weather-associated health risks. Arthritic and elderly pets may have more difficulty walking on snow and ice and may be more prone to slipping and falling. Long-haired or thick-coated dogs tend to be more cold-tolerant, but are still at risk in cold weather. Short-haired pets feel the cold faster because they have less protection, and short-legged pets may become cold faster because their bellies and bodies are more likely to come into contact with snow-covered ground. Pets with diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, or hormonal imbalances (such as Cushing's disease) may have a harder time regulating their body temperature, and may be more susceptible to problems from temperature extremes. The same goes for very young and very old pets."