BALLINGER - For more than a dozen years, Runnels County Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Glenda Wood has been known for her fair and even hand and at the end of the year, her third and final term will come to an end.

BALLINGER - For more than a dozen years, Runnels County Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Glenda Wood has been known for her fair and even hand and at the end of the year, her third and final term will come to an end.

Judge Wood, who was elected 12 years ago, decided not to run for re-election in 2017. Retired Game Warden Lane Pinckney was officially elected on Tuesday, May 22 in the runoff election and will take the oath of office on Jan. 1, 2019.

Wood has no intention of stepping down early.

“I will be here until the last day,” she said.

Wood ran for the job in 2006, after retiring from Ballinger National Bank, where she worked as a loan officer and vice president for 30 years. She came to Ballinger in 1971 and went to work for the bank. It was there that she became a very recognized and trusted member of the community.

After he retirement, friends suggested she run for justice of the peace. And she said “why not?”

She started her first term in 2007 and was re-elected to two more four-year terms.

After taking office, she began assuming the duties which includes presiding over criminal and civil cases, setting bonds, landlord and tenant dispute cases, truancy cases, conducting inquests, pronounces deaths and performs weddings.

“It’s a tough job - tougher than anyone realizes,’ Wood said. “But it is very fulfilling and satisfying.”

Since taking office, Wood has instituted many changes, not the least of which was to bring her third floor office in the Runnels County Courthouse into the 20th century.

“When I started here they didn’t even have computers,” shs said. “Everything was done by hand.”

Not so anymore. Wood has automated the office, installing computers and databases where the records are kept. She also used the funds the county alots for the office to purchase up to date office furniture.

On her desk are the books that she refers to often - “Texas Criminal and Traffic Law Manual” her reference book for criminal cases and “Texas Annotated Court Rules” for civil cases. Over the years she has heard many criminal and civil cases, both at bench trials or at jury trials, which she can call.

“I go by the law and the evidence,” she said. “People know I’m fair.”

But it is not always easy. The most difficult aspect of the position is acting as a coroner - which often involves very sad and stressful situations.

“Some of the cases will keep you up at night,” she said.

But there are other aspects of her duties that are very gratifying. Like helping an individual who has gone down the wrong path, find their way.

“I’ve helped people repair their lives along the way,” she said. “And that is always a good feeling.”

Wood said she will never retire - she is just going on to the next adventure. But she will have more time to see her family - daughters Kathy Hansen of College Station and Dawn Sproat of Frisco - who both graduated from Ballinger High School. She also has eight grandchildren - four girls and four boys - to keep up with.

Wood says that over the years, she has made many lifelong friends through the job located in Precinct 1, which includes Ballinger, Olfen, Rowena and Miles.

“You get so close to people and you make lifelong friendships,” Wood said. “I want to thank everyone for the opportunity to serve.”