RUNNELS COUNTY - Runnels County Sheriff's Office patrol vehicles have been completely outfitted with COPSync equipment, Sheriff Carl Squyres reported Monday.

RUNNELS COUNTY - Runnels County Sheriff’s Office patrol vehicles have been completely outfitted with COPSync equipment, Sheriff Carl Squyres reported Monday.

Squyres said equipment including cameras, mobile data terminals and printers have been installed in all six RCSO vehicles.

“We are still waiting on training,” Squyres said. “But all of the equipment including the messaging is functional.”

The Runnels County commissioners approved the purchase of COPSync, a nation-wide program that provides the sharing of information in real time between law enforcement agencies, school districts and local businesses, in February.

The company operates the nation’s only law enforcement real-time, information sharing network. The protection provided by COPsync includes not only law enforcement agencies, but entities such as schools, banks, hospitals, energy companies and more.

Runnels County Sheriff Carl Squyres said the S.O. was woefully behind technologically and that COPSync would “save our deputy’s lives and save the public’s lives.”

The cost of the program was $98,496, and included computers, cameras, training and COPsync fees, which can be paid out in five installments beginning Feb. 20, 2018.

The Ballinger Police Department has had COPsync since 2015. Winters and Miles departments have signed on as well.

The company filed for Chapter 11 on Sept. 29, according to a letter sent to customers, which included the Runnels County Sheriff’s Office, and police departments in Ballinger and Winters. The letter denied that the company was “going out of business,” and assured customers and clients that they will undergo intense “financial restructuring.”

Squyres said that he had received word on Monday that COPSync had been acquired by another company, however that could not be confirmed by press time.