COPsync, Inc. the company that is providing technology upgrades and support to law enforcement agencies throughout Runnels County, announced on Oct. 4 that the company has filed a chapter 11 bankruptcy to reorganize and regroup.

COPsync, Inc. the company that is providing technology upgrades and support to law enforcement agencies throughout Runnels County, announced on Oct. 4 that the company has filed a chapter 11 bankruptcy to reorganize and regroup.

In a news release, company officials said the move was necessary.

“We tried to avoid filing for Chapter 11, but it became clear to us it was the best way forward to usher in a new vision for COPsync,” stated COPsync Chief Executive Officer Ron Bienvenu. “I believe the COPsync products can help protect the men and women in law enforcement who put their lives on the line every day to protect our communities.”

The company filed for Chapter 11 on Sept. 29, according to a letter sent to customers, which includes the Runnels County Sheriff’s Office, and police departments in Ballinger and Winters. The letter denies that the company is “going out of business,” and assures customers and clients that they will undergo intense “financial restructuring.”

The bankruptcy filing did not come as a surprise to the local officials, who were aware COPsync was having financial difficulty and all are hopeful that the company will emerge from bankruptcy a stronger company.

In February, the Runnels County commissioners approved the purchase of a nation-wide program for around $100,000. The purchase included outfitting all RCSO patrol cars with cameras and and laptops. Payments to the company were set to start in February of 2018, according to reports.

Runnels County Sheriff Carl Squyres confirmed that the cameras were installed in the cars last week and that he expects to receive the mobile data terminals for the cars by the end of November.

“All of the things have been ordered,” Squyres said adding that he does not think the filing will completely shut down the plans. “They were having difficulty but I think they can recover. We are still going forward with this plan.”

The upgrade of the equipment for the Ballinger Police Department was approved in late February and was to include upgrades to the laptops in the patrol cars.

Ballinger Police Chief Stan Maresch said the plan is still to purchase seven new tablets for seven patrol cars and to continue using COPsync’s services. The upgrade was expected to cost about $45,000 Maresch said.

“We will continue using COPsync until they reorganize or are no more,” Maresch said. “We are going to stick with them.”

Winters Police Chief Paula Geyer had just received the package Monday, that COPsync sent to all of their customers informing them of the Chapter 11 filing. Last week, cameras were installed in the Winters PD patrol cars and they too are awaiting delivery of the mobile data terminals.

“I’m not sure what we will be doing going forward,” Geyer said. “If there are any issues I will have to present it to the City Council.”

In the release, officials say COPsync has faced challenges in the past year to include development and installation of legal updates, product updates, and customer service needs.

“In addition, COPsync has struggled to pay its creditors, employees and debt obligations,” the release states. “The Board of Directors authorized the filing of the Chapter 11 petition to definitively address these challenges.”